[CMLIB] Clean volatile registry entries in the same manner as Windows (#1883)
authormaharmstone <mark@harmstone.com>
Tue, 27 Aug 2019 00:39:27 +0000 (01:39 +0100)
committerHermès BÉLUSCA - MAÏTO <hermes.belusca-maito@reactos.org>
Tue, 27 Aug 2019 00:39:27 +0000 (02:39 +0200)
commite6a9aafe58f8938de7884fd06fb867144fe568ed
tree7430bcdbffcd485f518bd65ade6034f54cf11b84
parentd5dca45e5170b3759998d4dd782e4e1ea2e02347
[CMLIB] Clean volatile registry entries in the same manner as Windows (#1883)

This fixes the crashes in HvpGetCellMapped on Windows Server 2003 when booting from Freeloader, as mentioned in maharmstone/btrfs#16.

When the bootloader loads the system hive, it cleans the data pertaining to any volatile keys. The Windows bootloader does this by setting SubKeyCounts[Volatile] to 0. After boot, the kernel marks any cell where this is 0 but SubKeyLists[Volatile] isn't HCELL_NIL as dirty, meaning that the sanitized version will then get flushed to the disk.

Because Freeloader sets SubKeyLists[Volatile] to HCELL_NIL straightaway, Windows thinks the cell is clean, and can unload it without flushing. If it then reads it from the disk, it will crash in HvpGetCellMapped due to the stale volatile pointers.

If you break on nt!CmpInitializeSystemHive on Windows and "gu" to the let the function run, you'll see that DirtyVector of the HHIVE has only the first 8 bits set. If you run it using the official bootloader, it'll have a lot more than that.
sdk/lib/cmlib/cminit.c